Thoughts from Winnie the Pooh

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Winnie the Pooh and his friends were a childhood classic favorite of mine, and I love that they are still popular and relevant today! I was excited for the new Christopher Robin movie to come out, and some of the reviews reminded me of some of the best qualities of Pooh. After seeing the movie (which I recommend!), I came up with a list of lessons or reminders that are qualities Pooh and his friends exhibit. These are useful to remember, especially as we’re heading to the start of a new school year. (I promise-no spoilers!)

  • Find Students’ Motivation

While walking around London, Pooh got very excited when he saw balloons and had Christopher Robin buy him one. He held onto it the entire train ride and when returning to the 100 Acre Woods. He said the balloon made him happy. He also asked Christopher Robin if his work briefcase made him as happy as a balloon.

It’s important that we learn about our students-what are their personal interests and what motivates them. Then, it’s our job as educators to find ways to incorporate these into the classroom-whether it be during discussions (how was your weekend?) or examples during lessons. We want students to learn, so we should find ways to engage and motivate them!

  • Incorporate Play

Christopher Robin’s life is consumed by work, so he doesn’t have time to play anymore. Until others show him, he doesn’t realize he misses being silly, role-playing, or running around with his friends. He also doesn’t realize that his daughter just wants to play and have fun with him. Pooh and his friends want to spend all their time playing in the 100 Acre Woods.

School should be fun. If it’s all work, students will find it boring and tune out (even adults will). Find time to take brain breaks between activities, incorporate games into classes, have down time or recess. If you incorporate games or play into learning activities, students may not even know they are learning!!

  • Be Flexible

Pooh and his friends are creative and willing to try new things at time (well, maybe Piglet and Eeyore need some encouragement). Christopher Robin’s focus is to find a solution for his work dilemma. He is focused on the outcome but gets stuck on his path getting there.

A day at school is never as expected-that’s one of my favorite parts! Something always happens to make it exciting, adventurous, even frustrating at times. But if you stay focused on the positives and your goals, you’ll be able to find a solution. If you’re willing to be flexible-maybe a lesson goes too long or short, maybe you get off topic for whatever reason, maybe you need to play a game or incorporate some team building, that is okay. As long as you make baby steps towards the ultimate goals, you can see progress and know that you will get there, just maybe on a different path (or as Pooh would say “I get to where I’m going by walking away from where I’ve been”

  • Stay in the Moment

At one point Pooh asks Christopher Robin what day it is, which he responds, “Today”. Pooh then says, “My favorite day. Yesterday, when it was tomorrow, it was too much day for me”.

Pooh definitely embodies a character who lives in the moment. Every day is a new beginning, and we need to treat it that way. Whatever frustrations (or successes) happened yesterday, give each student a fresh chance at the beginning of the day. If you’re feeling frustrated or stressed from something, leave it in the car or at the door, so your focus at school is school. I know when I’m constantly looking ahead to everything I need to do or things coming up, I miss what’s happening in the moment and don’t enjoy it!

So let’s appreciate the “Todays” and act more like Winnie the Pooh!

Yoga: Letting Go and Trying Something New

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Last week, I went to yoga expecting my normal class.  To my surprise, class was cancelled due to an arm balance and inversion workshop.  Since I was there, I decided to go for it, with a little hesitation.  I’ve gained strength doing yoga, but still struggle with balances and being comfortable being upside down.  As I walked into the crowded room, I assumed I’d be the only one who couldn’t do a headstand.

Luckily, the workshop started off slowly with warmups and more basic postures.  I decided to give everything a try because what did I have to lose?!  As the workshop continued and the instructor demonstrated inversions and more advanced positions, I realized others were giving the same looks of bewilderment and I was not alone in beginning inversions.  Everyone gave her best effort, with some falling and laughter along the way.

By the end of the workshop, I had done a pike headstand independently, and a full headstand and handstand with someone spotting me.  I’m capable of doing it, I just need to figure out where my body should be independently to balance.  I was proud of my efforts.

As a new school is about to begin, I think of bringing this same mindset to my new role.  As a special education teacher, I’ll be working with a variety of students at different ability levels.  They will need to learn new skills and be supported along the way.  They will be given modifications, not to make things easier, but to help them be successful at their level.  As time goes on, they will be given challenges as well.  This will allow them to grow, learn, and build self-confidence.  Then, hopefully, they will feel balanced and proud of their efforts as well.